Archive for the Library Category

Manx traditional witchcraft steps out from the shadows…

Posted in Folklore, History, Library, Musings with tags , , , , , , on April 27, 2014 by manxwytch

Manxwytch is pleased to be a contributing author to the upcoming anthology on Traditional Witchcraft from Three Hands Press.

Hands of Apostasy A Witchcraft Anthology from Three Hands Press

 

 

More Monographs

Posted in Folklore, History, Library with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2012 by manxwytch

Numbers Two and Three of the Three Hands Press Occult Monographs arrived some time ago and I read them as soon as they arrived, but have had little time lately for writing.

Number Two is, The Devil’s Raiments, by Martin Duffy. Duffy is someone I had never read before but upon reading this monograph, I will go out of my way to find more of his writing. The monograph is subtitled, Habiliments of the Witch’s Craft, and it involves the various and varied vestments which adorn and veil the magical practitioner. Duffy’s book is a delight; his words are intelligent and well crafted, his command of the material is broad, lucid and thorough. There is much that his thoughtful analysis and exhaustive research have been able to add to my own knowledge of this subject matter.

He begins with the practitioner’s skin itself, the flesh-cloak clothing the indwelling divine light. He explores garment as fetish – a collection of symbols/powers accumulated by the individual in order to facilitate and express her/his work. These symbols may be put directly onto or into the skin, or they may be draped about it. Throughout is the theme of concealment and revealment, alteration and alignment. Every conceivable article of clothing or adornment seems to have been considered somewhere in this small but mighty book.  From the making, to the wearing of the garments are discussed, with all of their symbolic, psychological and magical implications. The sources from which come the costume of the spirit, be they vegetable or animal, colour the powers derived from and approached by the wearer.

From swaddling to shroud we are clothed in life and in death, and it behooves the witch to do so purposefully and with awareness. Mr. Duffy’s contribution to this awareness, and to the Three Hands Press Monographs is an extremely valuable one, and is, thus far, my favourite of the series.

The Third Monograph is written by William Keisel, of Ouroboros Press fame, and is entitled, Magic Circles in the Grimoire Tradition. Keisel here provides an introduction to the uses, materials, orientations (both directional and cosmological) and constructions of the magic circle, as found in the major historical grimoires most widely referenced today. The Books of Occult Philosophy, the Keys of Solomon, the Heptameron, Transcendental Magic, Liber Juratus, are all represented, as well as a few more modern sources such as Book 4 and Azoetia. The monograph is thorough and methodical, as one would expect from this author, but for a practitioner already familiar with the Western Magical Tradition, it doesn’t offer much beyond a general introduction. It appears to be written for an academic audience who may not be familiar with the nuts and bolts of the working Magical tradition.

This monograph’s great worth is in presenting all of the major sources of the Western Tradition in a single place, with some tantalizing glimpses of a possible in-depth metaphysical comparative study. Certainly a fascinating and worthwhile project, and Mr. Keisel would be the man for the job.

Review: Witchfather, A Life of Gerald Gardner

Posted in Library with tags , , on May 12, 2012 by manxwytch

By Philip Heselton

Thoth Publications

ISBN# Volume One:   978-1-870450-80-5

ISBN# Volume Two:  978-1-870450-79-0

Volume I – Into the Witch Cult

Volume II – From Witch Cult to Wicca

The life of Gerald Gardner had been exposed in 1960 by author Jack L. Bracelin in Gerald Gardner, Witch, published by Octagon.  This text was also said to have been ghostwritten by Idries Shah and was based on conversations with Gardner as he reminisced on his unusual life.  Much of Gerald Gardner, Witch has been notably regarded as a suspiciously questionable and clearly biased book.  Despite this, it is still a valuable addition to a Craft library for the simple fact that the stories are Gerald’s personal reflections of history and he recalls various vivid, fantastical and exiting adventures.  It is no surprise that Philip Heselton relied heavily on Bracelin’s work as the building block to his extensive research and he regards it saying “It really is virtually the only source of information for much of Gerald’s life and the broad narrative is largely accurate.” (Heselton, pp xviii) 

Gerald Gardner was quite a trickster who enjoyed a bit of ‘cloak and dagger’ even to the point of changing his and Dorothea’s names while travelling and in hotels. So working from Bracelin’s book, Heselton accomplished a type of investigation that should merit him with a Sherlock Holmes award of detective authorship.  Researching the scanty fragments of Gardner’s eccentric life, Heselton’s patience and seeming fascination with solving puzzles came to a head.  I could not help but notice that his background in geography and interest in landscapes allowed him a perspective that very few historians consider.  In fact it is precisely his geographic interests that may have given Heselton the ‘upper edge’ in his written work and opened doors of possibility and contacts he had perhaps not even dreamed.

At times the book may be overly detailed with lengthy descriptions of family, location, topographical maps, locations, letters and historical events.  If you are looking for a gripping, edge of your seat novel, this is not the book for you.  It is slow to read as Heselton uses every moment to add his methodical details to support his theories on who might have been involved with Gardner at various periods of his life, what Gardner might have been doing at that time, and even what Gardner might have thought.

Though there is a substantial amount of guesswork in Witchfather, it is held between areas of strong solid research and evidence.  Heselton does an excellent job to capture the picture of Gardner`s life, in a balanced and compassionate manner.  He has uncovered intriguing bits and pieces to Gardner`s biography and I am sure that there is plenty that he has kept in confidence due to the nature of the subject matter.

Overall Witchfather is a work to be applauded for not only the discovery of new material and people not generally known in Wica history but as well for a kindly and ethical search for truth, in the life of a man who enjoyed a few embellishments.

A Traditional Witchcraft Triple Bill

Posted in History, Library with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 25, 2012 by manxwytch

In addition to carving, I’ve been spending time with my bedside reading, making my way through a trio of new-ish offerings on the Traditional Craft.

Ars Philtron has been on my shelf for a while, but the broader scope of Viridarium Umbris demanded my attention first, even through the first edition of AP was the earlier publication. The Children of Cain is on loan from a witch who has university papers on medieval witch hunts to write, so I scooped it from her ample bookshelves until she has the time to go through it herself. The first of the Three Hands Press occult monographs is a recent arrival, and a quick and satisfying read that provided the icing on this particular occult layer cake.

Ars Philtron, Concerning the Aqueous Cunning of the Potion And its Praxis in the Green Art Magical, by David Schulke

Edition Codex Vasculum, Xoanon Press, 2008

In the author’s words, the focus of Ars Philtron is, “any ensorcelled aqueous coction compounded with Plant, Mineral, or Beast adjuncts, employed as a vehicle of enchantment.” (Italics are the author’s)

This book is part Alchemical, part Herbal, and part Grimoire. Simultaneously revealed and concealed within the writing style of the Cultus are instructions and lore dealing with all manner of potions, running the gamut from love philtre to thanatotic libation. Unfortunately, many of the formulae call for distillation equipment, putting them outside the scope of practice for most Green Witches and Wort Cunningfolk.

The author begins with a description of the materials and equipment used in the art, their preparation and function in the production of the potion. He proceeds to describe in detail the lore and manufacture of several classes of philtre, among them, aphrodisiacs, ablutions, sacraments, vinegars, potions to alter states of consciousness and dreaming, poisons and animating potions. To conclude, Schulke offers the consummation of the art, words to the Wise concerning the Real Work. This is followed by a brief lexicon and a useful bibliography.

Occasionally profoundly obscure, some sections require significant effort on the part of the reader to recall what it is the author is actually talking about. Though, as always, this offering from Mr. Schulke is a very thorough and valuable elucidation of the subject matter.

Children of Cain, A Study of Modern Traditional Witches by Michael Howard

Three Hands Press, 2011.

As the editor of one of the longest running and highest quality witchcraft periodicals in the world, The Cauldron magazine, Mike Howard is in an ideal position to write a history of modern Traditional Witchcraft.  His exposure to wide range of Craft traditions and practices over the years and his connections built up in the traditional community put him in a position to assemble and share a valuable history.

The Children of Cain is a general wander through the realm of modern Traditional Witchcraft.   The author provides a basic introduction to a dozen traditions in the UK and the US.  As might be expected from the author’s background, his approach is more journalistic than academic, and while some traditions are very well researched and referenced, others are presented with no new information offered than what has already been published elsewhere, and in some cases, no support given for what is offered beyond its presentation.  It may be in these cases that Howard relied only on secondary sources where he lacked personal contacts with the primary ones or, knowing what I know about Mike Howard, he chose to respect the privacy of his sources and their requests for secrecy about some aspects of their traditions.

Howard begins his book with Robert Cochrane and the Clan of Tubal Cain, providing a short biography of the former and a valuable description of the beliefs, tools, Gods and methods as well as the documented and oral history of the latter.  Howard has been severely criticized by one member of the Clan for his treatment of Cochrane, but in reading the criticism, I am left wondering if we have in fact read the same book!  My impression as a reader without a vested interest is that Howard has dealt fairly with the details of Cochrane’s life and that his treatment has been realistic and balanced.  I didn’t read a depiction of a “dysfunctional madman” in the author’s writing.  As for the other criticisms, again, as an outsider it looks like the Clansman is grasping at straws or suffering from tunnel vision fixating on the parts of Howard’s narrative he disagrees with.  There has been little written about the Clan from its originator, and what there is Mike Howard has used in detail, along with information from Cochrane’s successor and past associates in the Clan.

From here he goes on to describe The Regency in a lengthy section, providing some history and details on the more neopagan outer circle and the traditional inner circle and describing the important role The Regency played in keeping old witchcraft alive while simultaneously making it more available to the growing neopagan movement.

The next section focusses on the legendary George Pickingill and his nine covens, though much of what is here was already published in the Pickingill Papers, which Howard relies on extensively.

After this he details the Guilds, and again Howard has drawn extensively on secondary sources for historical information on the various guild groups making use of witchcraft including the Horsemen, the Toadmen and the Millers Word.  Regarding the initiation rites, Howard goes into rather more detail that I would like to see revealed in a general survey of traditions.

The final two sections deal with Traditional Witchcraft imported into the US by European immigrants and a trans-Atlantic review of the Old Craft today.  Today is used rather loosely to include figures and traditions from the 1900s on, including Cecil Williamson and his museums, Austin Osman Spare, Rosaleen Norton and the contemporary Cultus Sabbati, among others.  With his personal connections to the Cultus Sabbati, Howard does an excellent and in depth discussion of its history, influences and approach, speaking extensively about Andrew Chumbley and the contributions he made to the modern occult movement.  He also includes discussions with Daniel Schulke, Chumbley’s successor in the Cultus.

In all, I would describe the Children of Cain as an excellent and detailed introduction to the Modern Traditional Craft, but not the definitive work that its publishers would like it to be.  I do highly recommend it and consider it to be an essential addition to any witchcraft library.

Mysticism, Initiation and Dream, by Andrew Chumbley

Three Hands Press, 2012

This slender volume is the first of the Occult Monographs series published by Three Hands Press and is an academic paper by Andrew Chumbley surveying Voodoo, Sufism, Tibetan Bon and other sources on the subject of Dream Initiation.  The work is particularly valuable in that it is not an historical survey of dreams and their meanings, but instead the author posits two directions of work for oneiric praxis – the first is the grounding of the dream into the physical, the second is the ennoblement of the dreamer through the dream.  In the author’s words:

“It is as if the initiatory dream is a window – a transliminal portal, set on the border between many worlds and many states, through which the divine numen shoots forth a starry beam; a ray with which to inflame the mystic’s heart whilst on earth, but nonetheless to draw him heavenwards.”

Chumbley’s thesis is that through the interpretation of the symbols in dreams, the sacred is made manifest in the dreamer’s world; and through dreaming, the dreamer is linked in an immediate and personal way to the source of the mystical dream, which shapes his outlook and actions to move him in that direction.  The author also addresses the concept and role of the dream initiator and the universality of access and gnosis in the dreaming.

The breadth and depth of Chumbley’s understanding of his research subject is, as always, impressive, and this addition to his published works is heartily welcomed. The production quality of the volume is up to the Cultus Sabbati’s usual excellent standards. Tantalizing glimpses of future titles and authors show great promise for the series as it addresses a broad range of subjects in sufficient depth to be of use to both experienced practitioners and critical scholars.

Witchfather, A Life of Gerald Gardner

Posted in History, Library with tags , , , , , , on March 10, 2012 by manxwytch

By Philip Heselton

Thoth Publications

ISBN# Volume One:   978-1-870450-80-5

ISBN# Volume Two:  978-1-870450-79-0

I’m very excited to finally have the print copies of Philip Heselton’s crowning achievement in my hands. The ebook has been available from Thoth Publications for a few months and I pre-ordered the print version at that time.

These volumes constitute the definitive history of the early modern Craft and Gerald Gardner’s involvement in it.

I had been given a tip-off that the author had uncovered new research and was able to name the names linking Gerald to the Traditional Witchcraft covines on the Isle of Mann and to document the connection between that interaction and the development of what was to become Gardnerian Wica. So of course that is where I started reading.

As demonstrated by his previous books, Wiccan Roots and, Gerald Gardner and the Cauldron of Inspiration, Mr Heselton is a consummate researcher. His exhaustive scope and detail of study combine with his conversational writing style to produce a fascinating and readable history of an admittedly obscure subject. Up front about his position as a Gardnerian initiate, Heselton nonetheless researches and writes honestly, refusing to be selective in his reporting, and not interpreting his data to lead to a particular conclusion. He leaves the reader to decide, based on all the facts available in the source materials.

His deepening research has unearthed much additional material for the new books, making them important additions to the subject of study, even for those who have read Wiccan Roots, and/or The Cauldron of Inspiration. In the event that you haven’t read the earlier books, know that these new volumes will stand on their own as a fascinating study of the most important era in the development of the modern Craft.

Read the Review Here

I Like Big Books (and I cannot lie)

Posted in Library with tags , , on February 13, 2012 by manxwytch

A package arrived in the mail today.

A large package.

A heavy package.

In it was the third edition of Frazer’s The Golden Bough. All twelve volumes, published in 1920. Plus the supplement published in 1937.

The Golden Bough, Third Edition.

When I found it online, it was the second time in my life I had seen the third edition complete, and the first time I saw it, it wasn’t for sale.

I’m not a book snob, but I prefer old hardcover books to new mass market paperbacks, and I’m not a fan of ebooks. For something as influential and important as TGB, I want the most complete version I can get and this set dropped into my lap like a gift from the Gods.

It now takes pride of place in my Pagan Literary Orgasm section. I have a lot of reading to do. And more book reviews on the way.

Stay tuned.

Ex Libris: Viridarium Umbris

Posted in Library with tags , , , , , , , , on January 29, 2012 by manxwytch

Viridarium Umbris, The Pleasure Garden of Shadow, Which treats of the Secret Knowledge of Trees and Herbs. Deliver’d by the Fallen Angels unto Man.

Daniel A. Schulke, Xoanon Ltd., 2005.

The Verdelet and current Magister of the Cultus Sabbati has introduced a lifetime of work with plant lore and magic in this volume.

It is clear that Mr. Schulke is a master of his chosen field. The amount of research and practice that combine to make up VU is staggering. In addition to reliably drawing on folklore from a broad range of traditions, both of the New and of the Old World, the author also details valuable experiential exercises and practices to bring the reader and aspiring Green Witch in contact with the ultimate teachers, the plants themselves.

The book is organized into categories of herb lore, and each follows the same basic pattern. The section on the Wand for example, begins with a poem to engage the right side of the brain and to introduce the subject in broad and arcane terms.  Following this he reviews the folklore in general before describing a specific practice relating to the exploration of the qualities and powers of the tree branch. From here he supplies a charm or consecration script and a detailed description for the making of a wand by the practitioner. Next he describes the uses of particular species of tree from which one might fashion a wand, and to finish the section, Mr. Schulke describes several practices using wands and staves from his own tradition, along with a more detailed exploration of a particularly significant species used as a wand, namely the Hazel.

This pattern provides a thorough introduction to a host of aspects of Plant Magic ranging from one’s first approach to the Green World, it’s important inhabitants and the taboos associated with them, the values and qualities of various kinds of land ranging from Wild to Cultivated and that which lies In-Between. The Fertile and the Desolate, the Healing and the Harming are all dealt with. Invisibility, shapeshifting, necromancy, herbal medicine, the making of potions, incenses, dusts and other preparations are woven in with the worldview and approach of the Cultus Sabbati, of whom the author is the current Magister. The writing style of VU is typical of the publications of the Cultus, done in a quasi-archaic English with liberal use of Latin and Greek derivatives. I think it both admirable and appropriate to the subject matter as well as to the purpose of the book. Magic shouldn’t be written in language easily accessible to the uninitiated and the careful use of words reveals a careful consideration of the subject and requires a careful, conscious reading on the part of the audience.
The one thing that would make the book even more useful to me would have been the proper referencing of the author’s sources. I recognize many of the descriptions of constituents and correspondences, but it would have been invaluable for further study and research to know which sources Mr. Schulke drew from in those cases where the sources have been published. I have read other reviews which were critical of ambiguity or lack of detail regarding specific quantities in recipes or instructions but I do not share this criticism. I read VU as an herbal grimoire, not a cookbook. Further experience on the part of the reader and further publishing outside the scope of this very thorough introduction will see any gaps well-filled.

The Pleasure Garden of Shadow is tremendously valuable for anyone desiring to interact wisely and magically with the Realm of Plants, and is a broad and solid foundation on which to build one’s own knowledge and practice. It will be required reading for my students in the future, as will future Cultus publications from Mr. Schulke’s pen which will provide greater depth and detail in more specific areas of plant lore and practice – clearly his first love and area of greatest expertise.